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The Brazos Valley’s Guide to COVID-19 Mandates

Jul 02, 2020

Because the situation surrounding COVID-19 is constantly evolving, some information may not be up to date. Stay informed by following information from your local officials and by visiting the CDC website.

Our local and state governments continue releasing new information about COVID-19, which can be overwhelming when you’re trying to keep track of what’s happening. On June 22, 2020, Governor Greg Abbott held a press conference and encouraged citizens to wear masks and stay at home whenever possible. "I know that some people feel that wearing a mask is inconvenient or is like an infringement of freedom, but I also know that wearing a mask will help us to keep Texas open," he said. See what else Texas officials had to say.

Understanding the Five Levels of Bed Availability in Texas

On June 22, 2020, Governor Greg Abbott announced that while the number of cases is increasing, Texas is currently at Level Five on the scale of bed availability, which means there is still plenty of bed capacity in Texas. Experts determine the level by seeing how many beds in COVID-19 patient wings are available and, if there aren’t any, how many beds are available elsewhere. However, the number of available beds can fluctuate daily, so these declarations about levels can quickly become out-of-date. Here’s what they mean:

  • Level Five - COVID-19 patients remain in beds designated for COVID-19 patients.
  • Level Four - The COVID-19 wing is full, so COVID-19 patients surge into all physical beds within the ICU.
  • Level Three - The ICU is full, so COVID-19 patients surge into non-traditional care areas within the hospital, such as operating rooms or post-anesthesia care units.
  • Level Two - Non-traditional care areas are full, so COVID-19 patients surge into adjacent buildings, such as medical offices supported by the hospital.
  • Level One - Adjacent buildings are full, so COVID-19 patients surge into buildings of opportunity, like stadiums or conference centers.

Understanding Government Orders for the Brazos Valley

Many government officials throughout the Brazos Valley have released mandates over the past week. Karl Mooney, College Station’s Mayor, Andrew Nelson, Bryan’s Mayor, and Duane Peters, the County Judge of Brazos County, declared that all businesses must develop and implement health and safety policies. These policies must be posted in conspicuous locations, and they must require that all employees and patrons of the business wear face coverings and practice social distancing. Additionally, anyone over the age of 10 must wear a face covering when out in public and unable to maintain a safe amount of distance from others. You can read College Station’s Mayoral Order here, Bryan’s Mayoral Declaration here, and Brazos County’s Order here.

Looking for more resources? Check out our COVID-19 hub for the latest information on the virus. If you begin to experience symptoms of COVID-19, such as fever, a dry cough, or a sore throat, stay home and schedule a virtual visit with your St. Joseph and Texas A&M Health Network primary care physician. They can guide you on your next steps toward achieving better health.

Sources:
KBTX | Brazos County confirms 122 new COVID-19 cases